Category Archives: fashion

Entomology + E.A Séguy = Fabulous Textiles

I can’t believe I only just discovered Eugène Séguy ((1890 – 1985)…where have I been living?! He was a French entomologist who used his scientific knowledge to create fabulous and faithful illustrations and designs of butterflies and insects. He then transformed these into wonderful textile designs. His works spans both the Art Nouveau and Art Deco periods and frankly, I’m just captivated.

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Apparently, “Séguy wanted to use his artistic skill to glorify the sublime beauty of nature, creating what he called a ‘world of sumptuous forms and colours.’” I think he did just that!

seguy3I love the bold, contrasting colours…am I the only one that thinks they give off a west African textiles vibe?

Video

Clothing of the Future

Just discovered this funny video highlighting what fashion designers in 1939 predicted for the year 2000! What makes it even more funny is that when you sit back and think about it nothing has changed. Well, okay we’ve moved on a bit as we’re not predicting the exact same things and our predictions are a little more sophisticated (to keep up with the times) but on a general level we’re still forecasting wearable tech – functionality embedded in our clothes through technology.

Google Glass getting fashions stamp of approval at Diane Von Furstenberg Spring 2013 / via Getty

Google Glass getting fashions stamp of approval at Diane Von Furstenberg Spring 2013 / via Getty

Yes, in this video they talk about wearable tech – “an electric belt will adapt the body to climatic changes” and male outfits will be fitted with a phone and radio. Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll know wearable tech has been a big deal the last few years with everyone predicting it’ll be the next big thing. Now tech giants have entered the arena this “future” may be closer to reality with the launch of Google Glass next year.

So, if wearable tech does take off what will our future be like? Well CNN recently imagined such a thing and after consulting some experts this is how a day in 2015 pans-out.

Ever wanted to know when someone wwas staring at you? Now you can with Ying Gao's two dresses made of photoluminescent thread and eye tracking technology. The dress becomes "alive" when it detects a spectator's gaze.

Ever wanted to know when someone was staring at you? Now you can with Ying Gao’s two dresses made of photoluminescent thread and eye tracking technology. The dress becomes “alive” when it detects a spectator’s gaze.

Dresses Grown Magnetically

Love, love , love these dresses which were created in a collaboration between Dutch designers Iris van Herpen and Jólan van der Wiel! What’s so special about these dresses (and why I love them) is because they were “grown” by magnets.

A model wearing one of the magnetic dresses along with a pair of 3D printed shoes. Image from (http://www.irisvanherpen.com/haute-couture#wilderness-embodied-haute-couture)

A model wearing one of the magnetic dresses along with a pair of 3D printed shoes. Image from http://www.irisvanherpen.com

The dresses are part of Iris van Herpen’s Wilderness Embodied Haute Couture collection and were shown as part of the Autumn Winter 2013 fashion show in Paris earlier this month.

“Iris van Herpen focuses on the forces of nature, with a back and forth between innovation and craftsmanship. Beyond simple visual inspiration, this wonder of the natural world forms the basis of wild experimentation. With the help of artists, scientists and architects, Iris van Herpen explores the intricacies of these forces trough the medium of fashion, and the sensitive poetics that have long characterized her aesthetic vocabulary.Trough her collaboration with artist Jolan van der Wiel, who has spent several years pondering the possibilities of magnetism, they have created dresses whose very forms are generated by the phenomenon of attraction and repulsion.”

Close up of magnetic dress and the protrusions created by the magnetic force.

Close up of magnetic dress and the protrusions created by the magnetic force.

“To do this they manipulated a material made from iron fillings mixed into resin.
This composite material was added to fabric in small sections then pulled by magnets, creating a spiky texture and unique patterns.” You can read more here.

You may be surprised to learn that iron fillings suspended in a carrier fluid are used in car brakes, bridges and other bits of engineering (great little connection between fashion and engineering)! A few years ago I worked on a show about smart materials and magnetorheological fluids featured in it –  Jolan van der Wiel’s material sounds very much like this smart material. You can see the show here.